Zuba & Associates, P.C.

drunk driving Archives

Panel recommends lowering of BAC threshold in DWI cases

Illinois drivers will need to be more judicious with their alcohol if the state government accepts a plan to lower the drunken driving threshold currently being recommended by a scientific panel. Under that recommendation, the blood-alcohol concentration, or BAC, threshold would be lowered from .08 to .05.

Police say Illinois man had a BAC of .358 percent

A 46-year-old Illinois man has been charged with two counts of drunk driving after toxicology testing allegedly revealed his blood alcohol level to be more than four times the state's legal limit. Police say that the Chicago resident's breath test produced a reading of .358 percent. The limit is .08 percent.

President Trump draws attention to DUIs with a proclamation

Illinois residents may be interested in what president Donald J. Trump said about drunk driving when he declared December 2017 National Impaired Driving Prevention Month. President Trump included statistics showing that, every 50 minutes, one person dies in an automobile accident connected to driving while impaired in the United States. The president discussed how driving impaired is a choice and encouraged people to pledge to drive sober.

Marijuana DUIs increase among drivers

More people in Illinois and across the United States are driving under the influence of marijuana while fewer are driving drunk, according to the results of a national roadway study. As the number of drivers testing positive for alcohol decreased by 77 percent between 1973 and 2014, the number of drivers showing a marijuana-positive result rose by 50 percent between 2007 to 2014.

Study shows mandatory interlock laws reduce drunk driving deaths

Lawmakers in Illinois and around the country have been given fact-based evidence from researchers concerning the efficacy of laws that impose ignition interlock devices on the vehicles of convicted drunk drivers. These devices prevent vehicle operation when they detect alcohol in the driver. A study that analyzed more than three decades of national data on alcohol-related traffic fatalities found that these deaths went down the most in states where all people convicted of a DUI offense had to use ignition interlocks.

Impaired driving and its negative consequences

Illinois residents have certainly heard stories about drivers impaired after drinking alcohol or using marijuana. However, authorities say that there is a growing trend involving drivers who use heroin or similar types of substances. According to the 2014 National Survey of Drug Use and Health, 10 million people aged 12 and older admitted to driving while under the influence of illicit drugs such as heroin or meth.

The multiple ways to determine impairment

After passing a Breathalyzer test, an Illinois motorist may feel relieved that they won't be charged with a DUI. However, this will not always be the case. An officer may decide that an individual is acting too jovial or hostile, which can then be seen as a sign of impairment. Furthermore, if an individual admits to drinking prior to driving, they could still be charged with a DUI.

DHHS survey indicates that fewer Americans drive drunk

Law enforcement agencies in Illinois and across the country have clamped down on drunk driving in recent years, and these efforts appear to be paying off according to data from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. When the survey was first taken in 2002, a worrying 15.3 percent of the driving age Americans polled admitted to driving while impaired by alcohol during the previous year. However, that figure has been falling steadily ever since.

Companies seeking to develop marijuana tests

Illinois is one of many states that have legalized the use of marijuana for medical purposes. However, there are growing concerns when it comes to public safety, particularly surrounding the use of marijuana when driving. In fact, a study found that the number of car accidents involving drivers who were under the influence of marijuana actually doubled in Washington following the legalization of the substance for personal use in that state.

Potalyzer may change marijuana impaired driving tests

A device may change the way police in Tennessee and around the country test for impaired driving. Researchers at Stanford University have used magnetic biosensors to test for the presence of THC in saliva. THC is the most potent psychoactive chemical in marijuana. Law enforcement screening for THC had been dependent upon urine or blood tests, but both pose problems in terms of proving intoxication at the time the sample is drawn.

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